War on Terror

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The War on Terror is the Bush administration term for an organized American response to the world-wide threat of terrorists. It ties to the doctrine of pre-emption, which is the apparent right of the U.S. to intervene in the affairs of other nations it deems dangerous to its own interests.

Critics use the phrase "War on Terra" to criticize Bush's generally loose command of English pronunciation, but more importantly to bring to light the inherent dangers of a policy whose Golden Rule seems to be "do unto others before they do unto us".

Contents

Global Struggle

As of 2005, it appears that the term "War on Terror" is now passé. The administration is now pushing a new brand for this same set of activities, "The Global Struggle against Violent Extremism" (GSAVE) [1] [2] [3] [and more].

Government Involvement

Failures

The Taliban offered Osama Bin Laden to the U.S. in February 2001

  • recent article
  • original article
  • Dkos diary
  • WH press briefing

August 6th, 2001 memo warning of attack on the U.S. by Bin Laden: 8/06/01 Memo

Tora Bora

CIA Commander: U.S. Let bin Laden Slip Away by Michael Hirsh, Newsweek:

In his book—titled "Jawbreaker"—the decorated career CIA officer [field commander for the agency's Jawbreaker team at Tora Bora, Gary Berntsen] criticizes Donald Rumsfeld's Defense Department for not providing enough support to the CIA and the Pentagon's own Special Forces teams in the final hours of Tora Bora, says Berntsen's lawyer, Roy Krieger. (Berntsen would not divulge the book's specifics, saying he's awaiting CIA clearance.) That backs up other recent accounts, including that of military author Sean Naylor, who calls Tora Bora a "strategic disaster" because the Pentagon refused to deploy a cordon of conventional forces to cut off escaping Qaeda and Taliban members.
[T]he CIA field commander for the agency's Jawbreaker team at Tora Bora, Gary Berntsen, says he and other U.S. commanders did know that bin Laden was among the hundreds of fleeing Qaeda and Taliban members. Berntsen says he had definitive intelligence that bin Laden was holed up at Tora Bora—intelligence operatives had tracked him—and could have been caught. "He was there," Berntsen tells NEWSWEEK.

Timelines

Complete War on Terror Timeline

How Bin Laden got away: Detailed timeline with references

Authoritarianism

The term War on Terror is popular among authoritarian regimes, the regime has it’s own definition of terrorism and is able to justify it's continuing repression and crimes, like kidnapping and torture, war, etc.

Links

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/News/911lakoff.html

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