The Greens

From dKosopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

The German Green Party began as a few decentralized groups of environmentalists with similar interests. It was not until 1980 that they established themselves as a federal political party. In 1983 and in 1987 the groups achieved over 5% of the votes and were able to attain a few parliamentary seats. In 1998 the Green Party became a junior partner with the SPD, or German Social-Democratic Party, and broadened their platform to a full political spectrum.

When the party began it focused almost solely on environmental issues and on pacifism. They opposed the use of any type of nuclear weaponry or technology and NATO membership. There have been divisions within the group though. These were caused by such actions as military intervention in Kosovo and Afghanistan, and some felt that it strayed from their commitment to the party’s pacifist roots. According to “The Greens” official website there are five basic principles that the group seeks to carry out. They are:

  • 1. To build a society respectful of fundamental human rights and environmental justice.
  • 2. To increase freedom within the world of work.
  • 3. To deepen democracy by decentralization and direct participation of people in decision-making.
  • 4. To build a European Union of free peoples based on the principle of subsidiary.
  • 5. To re-orientate the European Union.

One of Germany’s most popular politicians, Joschka Fischer, has been the German foreign minister and the Deputy Chancellor in the red-green coalition since 1998. He has stepped away from a somewhat troubling past and has enjoyed great success amongst German voters. According to the most current German opinion polls, Fischer has been the most popular politician for the past several years, even amongst other competing parties. With Fischer’s leadership and ability to swing votes The Greens have become a formidable political party within the EU.

Joschka Fishcer has most reacently denounced any involvement in the Republican War in Iraq. Fischer has shown that he no longer looks to have a "locked in step" partenership with the United States. He also supported sending troops to Kosovo in 1998 and in turn lost considerable support by his own party. He also, unlike many Germans, favors Turkish membership into the E.U.

Sources

Personal tools