Energize America Transit Oriented Development

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Contents

The Transit Oriented Development Act - Background

Energy Implications

Urban regions can be highly energy efficient through having a high density of services which people can reach on foot or through efficient urban rail. Unlike traditional cities and towns or earlier "streetcar suburbs," the automobile dependent suburbs built after 1945 generally require automobile travel to get to work, go shopping, attend events, or make use of other services. These areas according to Dept. of Housing guidelines are now often referred to as sprawl.

Transit-oriented development (TOD) transforms the suburban strip mall into a local concentration of services ("downtown" or "neighborhood center") with high-density mixed-use housing (combined commercial/residential apartments) and a local transit stop to allow residents to accomplish much of their daily activities without need of a car. This leads to enormous savings in energy use and pollution and congestion from transportation. It also allows families to reduce the number of automobiles they own to one or less, saving each family thousands to tens of thousands of dollars each year.

Current Transit Oriented Development Status

Many suburban regions have zoning laws that prevent TOD...

Current Legislation and Activity

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References:

The Transit Oriented Development Act - Draft Text

Transforming American Suburbs

Objective

To greatly reduce automobile congestion, pollution, and oil consumption in US suburbs through federal enducements to alter local zoning laws and encourage transit-oriented development projects throughout the nation.

Description

Benefits

The TODA will ...

Investment

Key Messages

  1. Beautification as well as utility...
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