Dartmouth College

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General

Established: 1769
Location: Hanover, New Hampshire
Private

Background & History

Dartmouth, a member of the Ivy League, is a private, four-year, coeducational undergraduate college with graduate schools of business, engineering and medicine and 16 graduate programs in the arts and sciences.

Dartmouth is the nation's ninth-oldest college, founded in 1769 by Rev. Eleazar Wheelock for the education of "youth of the Indian Tribes ... English Youth and others ..." Dartmouth became coeducational in 1972. Its colors are Dartmouth Green and white; its nickname is "The Big Green."

A flexible academic schedule (the Dartmouth Plan) is possible through the use of a year-round calendar consisting of four ten-week academic terms (fall, winter, spring, and summer). Students include terms of on-campus study, off-campus study in Dartmouth programs or at other institutions, and vacation terms in their individual Dartmouth Plans. Sixty-three percent of all Dartmouth students participate in at least one of the approximately 45 different off-campus options.

Dartmouth's 34 intercollegiate teams are members of NCAA Division I and compete largely within the Ivy League and the ECAC. With a strong emphasis on equal opportunity, Dartmouth's athletic opportunities include 16 women's programs, 16 men's programs and two coed teams. In addition, nearly a dozen club sports are available; 3,000 undergraduates annually take part in nearly two-dozen intramural sports.

Dartmouth College and Daniel Webster are also famous for "the Dartmouth College case" more properly known as Trustees of Dartmouth College v. Woodward which laid the foundation for much of corporate law in the United States.


Notable Alumni

Famous alumni of the college include Daniel Webster (1801), poet Robert Frost (1896), Kanichi Asakawa, the founder of Asian Studies in the United States (1899), pioneering biologist E.E. Just (1907), Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel (1925), Vice President Nelson Rockefeller (1930), former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop M.D. (1937), former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich (1968), and writer Louise Erdrich (1976). Also Hillary Goodridge (1979) of Goodridge v. Massachusetts and Beth Robinson (1986) lead council in the Baker vs Vermont case.

Grant Activity

From 1997-1998, grants totaling $90,161[1] from the John M. Olin Foundation financed the following activities at Dartmouth:

Other Grant Activity

From 1989-1999, additional grants totaling $199,402 have been received from the following organizations:

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