Capitalist theocracy

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A blend of capitalist economic policy with theocratic social policy. Its most extreme form may be witnessed today in oil states such as Saudi Arabia.

Perhaps as a result of its long dealings with the Saudis, the Bush dynasty has indicated its intentions of evolving toward a similar capitalist theocracy in the United States, as exemplified by its embrace of the Republican Unholy Alliance and its platform of blending church and state.

The neoconservative worldview similarly takes Israel as its model government. While Israel displays some qualities of capitalist theocracy, it also includes a significant and aggressive military component, with occupation and annexation of territory a core part of its history.

After 9/11, Bush administration foreign policies were patterned after Israel's, during which time the US invaded and occupied Muslim territory and attempted to pacify those populations by force, while making extensive use of private enterprises such as Halliburton. This model might best be termed "imperial capitalist theocracy."

Extreme capitalist theocracies are noted for their leaderships' unwillingness or inability to be concerned with the needs of their people, preferring to leave them in the care of a state religious institution, or several independent ones, that are given broad powers to enforce compliance and noninterference with the state's rapacious business practices and policies. (See faith-based initiatives)

In most extant cases, this neofeudalism has grown organically out of the need to integrate existing feudal structures with the pace and process of capitalist globalization. It is unclear what the result of an extended attempt to impose this model on populations that have already been liberated under more egalitarian, secular pluralisms would be. However, temporary enforcement of such a model might be possible upon any society if enough stressors were applied beforehand, such as war, widespread terrorist activity, or economic depression.

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